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ScotchBonnet's Recipe Index

Moderator: ScotchBonnet

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ScotchBonnet
BIRD'S EYE
BIRD'S EYE
Posts: 1571
Joined: Sat May 23, 2015 6:54 pm
Favourite Curries: Garlic Chilli Chicken, Tandoori Lamb Tikka, Veggie
Location: Glasgow

ScotchBonnet's Recipe Index

Post by ScotchBonnet » Sun Feb 07, 2016 1:14 am

SOME BASICS
Mix Powder 1 - my standard simple mix powder. An exotic blend of carefully prepared whole seeds and select spices.

SB's Kilo-Base - my standard base gravy using everyday quantities: 1Kg onions, 400g tin of tomatoes etc.

SB's Pressure Cooker Base Gravy - a very simple base gravy using standard supermarket quantities and using a pressure cooker to reduce energy use and effort.

SB's small batch thick base - a slightly coconutty base gravy yielding enough for about 4-6 portions of curry.

Panch Phoran - a simple mixture of 5 types of seeds. Great in Bombay potatoes, veg. samosas, dahl, etc.

Basic curry paste - a useful all-round curry paste to use instead of mix powders etc. Keeps well and you can take it on a camping holiday, for instance. Add chilli to get the heat.

Basic onion goo - an onion paste for adding body and shine to an otherwise thin or boring curry.

Pre-cooked lamb - succulent chunks of marinated lamb cooked quickly in the oven. They remain pink in the middle and allow some leaway when heating up in a curry so that they don't end up over-done.


MAIN DISHES
Seekh Kebabs - the best lamb meat is ground and then mixed with just a few select spices for a lovely savoury kebab that goes well with a number of sauces. Serve with salad and flat bread or rice. Can be ordered as a main or as a starter.

Garlic Chilli Chicken - for anyone who desires chilli, garlic, a classic curry experience this is a highly recommended dish. It has a firm fan-base following.

Chicken Korma - it really doesn't get much easier than this for a very satisfying mild classic. I am forced to make this, on average, once per week for certain members of my family who will not countenance any changes to the basic recipe.

(slightly) Lower Calorie Chicken Korma - no proper korma can truly be described as low calorie but this version contains just over half the fat of the regular version and is also just a little bit spicier to compensate and maintain the great flavour.

Chicken Chasni - a blast from the past; once Glasgow was sure that the world had accepted chicken tikka masala they foisted this mildly spicy, creamy, sweet-and-sour(ish) creation on the world. My youngest daughter's favourite.

Chicken Tikka Jaipuri - a favourite of mine from the early '90s; capsicum, mushroom and a lucious sauce. You can make your own chicken tikka or just buy a pack from your local frozen food shop.

Chicken Jalfrezi - there are, essentially, two versions of this that I have regularly encountered. Both have fried vegetables but one is a "typical" curry with sauce/gravy and the other is a bit drier and hotter with a soothing, creamy sauce poured over it just before serving.

Chicken Achari - a nice hottish dish with a sauce enlivened by the addition of Indian pickles.

Chicken Pathia - I always think of a pathia as being the curry with the runniest sauce. It's not thick, it's not too oily and (if you're not careful) the chicken can be a bit bland, but this version is designed to deliver that authentic feel and taste with succulent cuts of chicken floating in a sweet and tangy sauce containg mango and well-balanced spices.

Pudina Gosht - lamb with mint sauce, Indian-style. Simply sublime.

King Prawn Madras - king prawns are cooked but still tender and combined with a spicy sauce which is hot yet does not mask the flavour of the basic ingredients.

Chicken Madras (standard version) - a typical restaurant-style madras which will delight those who appreciate spiciness but which will also not be too hot for those seeking to try something more adventurous.

SB's cheap 'n' easy Madras - this is a dish ideally suited to three blokes (or blokesses, or a combination thereof) who come home from the pub and who want a quick, no-nonsense curry using stuff in the freezer and cupboard. Get the rice on, take the chicken out of the freezer and a wonderful feast for all can be made in under 30 minutes.

Chicken Ceylon - this dish combines the heat of fresh chillies with slightly sweet and creamy coconut for a most pleasing blend.

Chicken Vindaloo - this is a traditional Goan dish for the lover of hotter curries that also contains a flavoursome combination of spices that will not disappoint. Yoghurt is available on request should any of our diners find that they require it.

Chicken Dhansak - a lovely blend of delicately-spiced chicken married with exquisitely-prepared lentils inspired by the great Parsi cooking influence, A medium-hot dish but please ask if you would prefer added chillies.

Murgh Multani Korma - a mild-to-medium strength dish from the Kashmir region made with cream and ground cashew nuts. No coconut and not quite as sweet as a "regular" korma.


ACCOMPANIMENTS

Spiced onions - a simple onion dish for scooping up with papadum at the start of a BIR-style meal or for serving with pakora, grilled meats etc.

Onion Pilau Rice - delicately flavoured and beautifully cooked to rice which will prove an ideal companion to any of our curry dishes.

Easy mushroom rice - just three (four if you count water) ingredients, a microwave oven and a pan.


VEGETARIAN

Rajasthani mixed vegetable - a simple, yet satisfying, curry with a hint of exotic spices. Acceptable to Vegans.

Vegetable Biryani - a traditional Mughlai dish loaded with chopped vegetables and delicate spices and served with a spicy curry sauce.

Aloo Matar - potatoes and peas; a staple for millions.

One-Pot Dal - easy to make, cheap and very, very versatile.

Pressure cooker dhal - modern technology is married here with traditional ingredients to create a lovely lentil dish whilst being kind to the environment in its low use of energy.

Besan Mirchi - spiced green peppers in chickpea flour. Very moreish.

Mushroom Matar - delicately spiced mushrooms to get the appetite going or as an accompaniment to your favourite main dish. Can also be served on puri for a more filling starter or small main dish in its own right.

Rajma Masala - red beans in a spicy gravy. A popular dish of any Punjabi household.

Matar Paneer - pieces of Indian cheese are sautéed in vegetable oil and then simmered with peas in a flavoursome sauce to create this delicious North Indian meat-free classic.

Kadai Paneer Masala - pieces of Indian cheese cooked with peppers and onion and simmered in a lightly-spices tomato sauce which is thickened with the addition of ground cashew nuts.


Non-BIR DISHES
Nepali Lamb Pakuwa - this is a special-order dish for lovers of hot meat curries. Please let us know a day in advance and our chefs will gladly prepare this dish for you and your friends. It is one of our staff favourites.


PHOTO GALLERY
Aloo Matar
Aloo_Matar.jpg
Chicken Chasni
Chasni_20150709.jpg
Chicken Achari
Chicken Achari 20160128.jpg
Jaipuri
Jaipuri_20150627a.jpg
Fried Vegetables for Jalfrezi
Jalfrezi_Veg.jpg
Chicken Korma
Korma_20150917.jpg
Chicken Madras
Madras_20150615a.jpg
Rajasthani Mixed Vegetables (as a side portion)
Rajasthani_Veg2.jpg
Chicken Ceylon
Ceylon_20160218.jpg
One-Pot Dal
One-Pot Dal 2.jpg
Besan Mirchi
Besan_Mirchi_2.jpg
Mushroom Matar
Mushroom matar.jpg
Vegetable Biryani
Veg_Biryani.jpg
Kadai Paneer Masala
Kadai_Paneer_20161208.jpeg
Chicken Korma (left) and Chicken Pathia (right)
Patia_Korma.jpg
"There is no such thing as too much oil; just an insufficiency of naan".

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charliebir
CAYENNE
CAYENNE
Posts: 1213
Joined: Tue May 26, 2015 2:45 pm
Favourite Curries: Pathia, Garlic Chilli, Madras.
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland.
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: ScotchBonnet's Recipe Index

Post by charliebir » Sun Feb 07, 2016 11:12 am

Thanks SB.

Will try some of these soon !
Charlie.

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Cory Ander
MODERATOR
MODERATOR
Posts: 8802
Joined: Sat Mar 02, 2013 3:52 pm
Favourite Curries: King Prawn Phal
Location: Perth, Western Australia
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Been thanked: 5 times

Re: ScotchBonnet's Recipe Index

Post by Cory Ander » Mon Feb 08, 2016 11:43 pm

Nicely done, SB, thanks for taking the time and effort! :thumbup:
Regards

CA (aka Admin) :)

rshome123
BHUT JOLOKIA
BHUT JOLOKIA
Posts: 4354
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:38 am
Favourite Curries: Chicken Vindaloo
Location: Warrington, North West England

Re: ScotchBonnet's Recipe Index

Post by rshome123 » Tue Feb 09, 2016 12:00 am

Top Notch SB.

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